South American Government Writing

Posted on February 11, 2014

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Sixth Graders,

The image below shows the requirements for the writing that is due on Wednesday. You will need to turn in your chart, your rough draft that has been marked for editing, and a final draft free of errors.

Government Writing

Be sure to check for our sixth grade non-negotiables of writing.

  • All sentences begin with capital letters.
  • All sentences contain end punctuation.
  • Capitalize the word I.
  • Paragraphing (when appropriate).
  • No texting shorthand (IDK, LOL, for example)

Finally, make sure your reading is clear and concise.

 

READINGS from micitizenshipcurriculum.com

Country Information

Venezuela

Hugo Chavez

Recently, Venezuela passed a law by democratic vote to repeal term limits for their elected officials.  This means that a president can run for office as many times as he or she wants to. This law was promoted by Hugo Chavez, the internationally famous president.  In his continuing mission to create a 21st Century Socialist state or, as he calls it, the Bolivarian Revolution, Chavez has repeatedly said that he is the only one that can complete the necessary changes and that he needs more time to complete them.  With a rising crime rate and an impending oil crisis, the country is facing difficult challenges in addition to these goals.  Almost half of the electorate voted no on the referendum, they were defeated by a slightly larger majority to repeal term limits.

Chavez has served as the leader of the new South American politics.  In many ways, he has set the standard for leaders in South America, enacting his 21st Century socialism, an idea that has spread to Bolivia and Ecuador.  Both of these countries have adopted new constitutions guided by a philosophy that Chavez crafted.  Also, leaders have looked to Chavez as a role model for what is possible and acceptable behavior for Presidents in these new governments.  21st Century Socialism is guided, more so than other democratic-leaning systems, by a powerful figurehead. Now that Venezuela has abolished term-limits, other leaders in South America may attempt to do the same, following Chavez’s lead as a president.

After an attempted military coup in 1998, Hugo Chavez was elected president of Venezuela.  A charismatic general who has created a unique historical narrative for South America by weaving together Christian Liberation theology, oil revenues, and tenets of European socialism, he has spurred a political change in South America that will most definitely guide future events on the continent.

Source:

Term Limits in Venezuela. 12 January 2010 <http://meinquito.wordpress.com/2009/02/19/term-limits-in-venezuela-lesson-plan/>.

 

Venezuela

 

Hugo CHAVEZ, president since 1999, seeks to implement his “21st Century Socialism,” which purports to alleviate social ills while at the same time attacking globalization and undermining regional stability.  Current concerns include: a weakening of democratic institutions, political polarization, a politicized military, drug-related violence along the Colombian border, increasing internal drug consumption, overdependence on the petroleum industry with its price fluctuations, and irresponsible mining operations that are endangering the rain forest and indigenous peoples.

 

Source:

The World Factbook. CIA. 12 January 2010 <https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/index.html>.

Ecuador

Rafael Correa Delgado

Rafael Vicente Correa Delgado (born 6 April 1963) is the President of the Republic of Ecuador and a self-described “humanist and Christian of the left“.  An economist educated in the United States, he briefly served as Finance Minister in 2005; he was elected President in late 2006 and took office in January, 2007.  He was elected to a second term in April 2009.

Correa has criticized Ecuador’s draft free trade agreement as currently negotiated with the US, although he does advocate expanding trade and opening markets with other countries, urging in particular, the integration of South American economies.

On foreign policy, Correa commented on Ecuador’s relations with its neighbor Colombia. Correa stressed Ecuador’s interest in staying uninvolved in internal conflict in Colombia.  In October 2006, Correa added that he would “pursue and capture” FARC (Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia) members if they enter Ecuador.  He also declared that he condemns their kidnappings, violations of human rights and bombings.  Later, during his presidency, Colombia’s police accused Correa of ties with the FARC. Correa denied the accusations.

Correa also commented on Ecuadorian-Venezuelan relations.  In August 2006, Correa told the Ecuadorian press that he is not part of the Venezuelan Bolivarian movement, although he considers Hugo Chávez a personal friend.

In addition to his platform on economic and social policy, Correa’s ability to communicate with Ecuador’s indigenous population in their own language also differentiated him from the other presidential candidates. He learned Quichua (a native language) in his youth during a year he spent volunteering in a remote highland town.

http://www.juventudrebelde.co.cu/international/2009-01-09/rafael-vicente-correa-delgado-biography / 

Ecuador

Although Ecuador marked 25 years of civilian governance in 2004, the period has been marred by political instability. Protests in Quito have contributed to the mid-term ouster of Ecuador’s last three democratically elected Presidents. In September 2008, voters approved a new constitution; Ecuador’s twentieth since gaining independence. General elections, under the new constitutional framework, were held in April 2009, and Correa was reelected.

 

Source:

The World Factbook. CIA. 12 January 2010 <https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/index.html>.

 


Colombia

Alvaro Uribe Velez

 

Álvaro Uribe Vélez, born 4 July 1952 in Medellín, is the 39th President of Colombia and is currently serving his second term in office. Before his current role in politics, Uribe was a lawyer. He studied law at the University of Antioquia and completed a post-graduate management program at Harvard University.[

Under his presidency, the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) have suffered a series of military defeats, the main paramilitary groups have gone through a demobililization process and he has spearheaded several Free Trade Agreements with different countries. President Uribe’s concrete actions tend to show him as a staunch enemy of narcotics trafficking, as his administration has been responsible for arresting and extraditing more drug traffickers to the United States and to other countries than all other presidents to date. He has been publicly recognized as a supporter of the US war on drugs by continually implementing the anti-drug strategy of Plan Colombia.

Uribe’s government, along with Peru and Ecuador, negotiated and (with Peru) signed a free trade agreement with the US. On December 30, 2005, President Uribe signed a free trade agreement (FTA) with Mercosur and gives Colombian products preferential access to the market of 230 million people. Trade negotiations have also been underway with Mexico, Chile, the Andean community and the USA over its current proposal.

Colombia

 

A four-decade long conflict between government forces and anti-government insurgent groups, principally the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) heavily funded by the drug trade, escalated during the 1990s. The insurgents lack the military or popular support necessary to overthrow the government and violence has been decreasing since about 2002, but insurgents continue attacks against civilians and large areas of the countryside are under guerrilla influence or are contested by security forces. More than 31,000 former paramilitaries had demobilized by the end of 2006 and the United Self Defense Forces of Colombia (AUC) as a formal organization had ceased to function. In the wake of the paramilitary demobilization, emerging criminal groups arose, whose members include some former paramilitaries. The Colombian Government has stepped up efforts to reassert government control throughout the country, and now has a presence in every one of its administrative departments. However, neighboring countries worry about the violence spilling over their borders.

 

Source:

The World Factbook. CIA. 12 January 2010 <https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/index.html>.

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